UPSKILLING AS AN URGENT MISSION

The speed of technological change requires an urgent global upskilling effort.It’s a new world that needs new skills. To many, that is an exciting prospect because it speaks to progress. By upskilling, we mean giving our employees opportunities to gain the knowledge, tools and ability they need to use advanced and ever-changing technologies in the workplace and their daily lives. Upskilling is the process of acquiring new and relevant competencies needed today and in the near future. Common examples of upskilling efforts include digital skills, analytics skills, and organizational transformation skills. Upskilling is the process of acquiring new and relevant competencies needed today and in the near future. Common examples of upskilling efforts include digital skills, analytics skills, and organizational transformation skills.

Not everyone has to learn to code, but many people need to understand and manage artificial intelligence, data analytics, autonomous vehicles and other technologies we can't yet predict — those emerging now and those that will be created in the future. Yet the cost of inaction will be worse. Already, there is a skills mismatch around the world and millions of jobs are going unfilled. It is not possible to recruit enough already-skilled people to do them. The only option is to help members of the existing workforce, those currently excluded, those starting their working lives and those in the next generation gain the knowledge and skills they need — and that society needs them to have — in the digital age. Upskilling is not simply a matter of teaching people how to use a new device. That device may be obsolete by next year.

The upskilling experience involves learning how to think, act and thrive in a digital world that is sustainable over time.For example: The growing use of surveillance devices is forcing us to think differently about ethics and governance. Advances in genetic engineering and artificial intelligence are raising questions about the nature of being human. The ‘digital divide’ between rich and poor has led us to consider what constitutes a fair economy. Social fracturing has been exacerbated by digital media, causing us to question the credibility of information. And sooner or later, the pressures of climate change and advances in energy technology and mobility will force us to rethink our approaches to environmental sustainability. 


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